Photographer: Hunter, Shopper and Thief

30 01 2011

Eckert Power Station, Lansing, MI, © Michael Maurer Smith 2011

Photography is an act of collecting and consumption. It is therefore in keeping with the zeitgeist of our times—particularly here in the United States.

As a nation we are dedicated to the production and acquisition of material goods. Our personal and national success and status is measured by what we can acquire, accumulate and show. We value nearly everything using economic measures. Everything, including reality, as exemplified by so-called “reality television,” is priced and offered for sale.

So it is we consume and value images as physical stand-ins for the desired object—the poster of the Ferrari or some other object of desire.

The photographer anticipates, observes, stalks, selects and takes the pictures, much like the hunter, shopper or the thief. Likewise, the photographer exists at the edge, outside the action even when in the midst of it. The photographer is by self-selection a voyeur, commentator, and the witting or unwitting shaper of propaganda. It is nearly impossible for the photographer to make a photograph that is not in some way a political statement—the tangible evidence of personal and cultural values made manifest and fixed.

Painters and writers also observe and collect but their art generates from interpretation and expression spread over time—multiple paint strokes, mixing, word changes, edits and erasures until finally the work is declared finished. This kind of expression is very different than using a mechanical device (the camera) to record the appearance of something in a moment of time.

The painter of necessity is immersed in the act—he or she is doing the painting and it will go whatever way the painter takes it. The photographer, by contrast, is separated from the action by the tool and technology—she or he cannot photograph the boxing match and be one of the boxers.

So one may say that photography is the (sometimes creative) act of exploiting and trafficking in arrested development. The photograph is a selective extraction from the flow of life that is presented and represented as a product that then may be collected and consumed.

© Michael Maurer Smith 2011